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January 15, 1931     The Issaquah Press
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January 15, 1931
 

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hisWeek THE ISSAQ!_AH PRESS Some Small Straws Hope Deferred We Rebuke Liberia As Hitler Sees Us ARTHUR BRISBANE straws blowing in an un- direction are not important themselves but call for attention. a group of farmers in Ar- entered stores, demanding VOLUME 15 Sidewalk Program Is Side-tracked Council decided at last l "night's meeting to start for their children, all over again. came a not very serious on the Newark City Hall by At the special meeting of the Clt: .'ho call themselves! Council last evening announcement was made that sufficient signatures the' accompanied the paving protest to in New York, acro River, crowds stormed Sal- prevent the work continuing. This left two courses to be pur- sued: either drop the matter entire- ly and assess the expense thus far incurred, about $2,000, against the district sought to be paved, for which the tax payer would receive nothing in return, or start all over again. i After due deliberation it was de- cided to take the latter course. Army food sores shoutin stan-e ! Fight." Fifty injured. this doesn't mean much among people, but it does mean any distribution of food or or arrangements for free should be looked after by efficiently . It isn't ..... ID ISSAQUAH, KING CO., WASH, THURSDAY, JAN. 15, 1931 i ii A/ong Concrete NUMBER 19 The 6da Falow00IS00dew.lk Stua,00o. 00ders_!ns_tal! ..................... I Facinglssaquah _ ' Rebekahs a n d subordi- nate lodge held joint ins- tallation Friday evening. An important event in local Odd- fellowship was the installation of of- ficer in the three lodges last week. The Rebekahs and Odd Fellows held a joint installation Friday eyeing and the Encampment installed Saturday evening. The work Friday evening was put 1 on by Mrs. Myra Fairbanks, past I president of he Rebekah Assembly, assisted by local officers, and the Council explains situation as they view it; asking the Voters to consider well. Why is it necessary to have side- walks put in at thls time? 1st. Only about one-half of the Town has sidewalks. 2nd. Of those, ordy about tenth are concrete; the others wood, and in only a few cases a. these safe to walk upon. The others are beyond repair and will have to be torn up and replaced. 3rd. Two years ago an ordinance following team for the subordinate t was passed to the effect that all walks work: M. L. Longfellow, deputy l in the future would have to be re- grand master, assisted by Thos. placed with concrete. Gillebo, E. I Smith, W. W. Levy and 4th. The Town is liable for all for a Red Cross, a Salvation: or any other organization out- of the government. deferred maketh the heart in the Bible, and i is also decision handed down by the States Circuit Court of Ap- telling Judge Clark of New that he was mistaken. The amendment was adopted It stands, and is the law land. To which you may add I the amendment won't be repeal- 1 for many a day. Stimson warns the Ne- republic of Liberia that slavery l be abandoned. Investigation I that high officials of the Ne- republic, including the vice pres- are engaged in the slave trade, i persist in it. seems surprising, Considering Liberia was planned as a haven slavery. s $ many of our best people and South, approved of slav- s little while ago, and we can blame the Liberians for lag- There were two strong points carrying weight for this come. First, j when protests were first called for in| .i r-o | a legal way but 16 2-3 percent off( .|1..  e.,00nteen the property owners made legal pro-| .... test. Since then over sixty pereent i tz 1 of those intrested have signed a pro-[ VL/|:gg: I -ran-,ers signed without understanding the t . v A,. case and asked to have their names taken off the petition. This could not be done. o the' administration feels a ma- jority of those interested would pre- fer going ahead to dropping the work and pay out $2,000.00 with no returns whatever. Consequently, at council meeting today noon,a new resolution, changed somewhat to carry the paving on the West highway to the Western town limit, was passed and appears in this issue. In another article in this issue the matter is being fully explained by the council, and it is to be hoped ev- eryone interested makes a thorough study of the project. BORN Jones--In Hobart, Saturday, Jan. 10, 1931, to Mr. and Mrs Marshall Local degree team active in subordinate and Pomo- na degree worL With about one hundred in atten- dance, Grangers enjoyed an interest- hag evening at the regular meeting Monday night. The big attraction was the confer- ring of the third and fourth degrees i on a class of eighteen members, four from May Creek Grange, one from Issaquah and thirteen from Midway Grange, located at Midlake, between Bellevue and Remond. Twenty-five visitors accompanied the candidates. The degree work was given by the local drill team. The team also put on work at  Midway Tuesday evening and at Happy Valley Wed- nesday evening. They have also been a little behind, especially as sla- Jones, a girL asked to put on the Pomona degree is about their only source of l at East Hill tonight, where Valley . stick of. candy. Prices are stronger, ! Central Grange i s entertaining slave owner gave his slave money m absolutly a drug m the[ King County Pomona. Y::dhdgl0wto?ao=tP  7i:tkind with which men speculate [ r:edm:cetingalmut nchen :7 sick. , call money, was lent recently at I[ s __   - lern industrialists gave the lper cent. And cheap money promis- joy.  er enough to keep  him going, | es to last a long time. On this o| _ _  . need not worry about him when[mon, proDavLg, ne l,'eaerm  ] LiAVINO LgSAUAM sick. In the eyes of Providence' will not try to force up intmt| .- "" ....... may not be a great differencel rat and that ought to help b| Dr Wm E Lihtburne who has bodily slavery and what  recovery " " " *"" ' Socialist friends call "wage s/a- " e * ] been practicing in Iasaquah the past I "Men fear death as children fear] to go in the dark, and as that natural] fear in children is increased with i tales, so is the other." t So Bacon said of our moat wide- I spread fear. Marshal Joffre, who has the grati- tude of his nation following him to the grave, quoted often the saying nul ne peut se dire heureux scant son dernier jour. "No man can call himself happy until his last day." see ourselves as others think see us, reveals surprising de- The Jewish Telegraph Agen- sends etening quotations the Volkiseher Beobachter, pub- ia Munich, to support Mr..Flit- imitation of Mussolini's Fuse- Under a heading "The true of America," you learn that build "'mausoleums for cats of! marble," and church build-i of "unheard of splendor," and have "'evangelists who flood the wallowing in disgraceful adventures that are reported in sensational press." you learn that a mother of children, "crazed with hun- shot seven of her babes and tried kill herself." paper, not saying what was matter with the other four, adds: is America*. Millions of cats, for hypocrisy, billions for luxury, but not a cent for mother and her hungry chil- all that is true, probobly we de- our "depresaiom" i making a brave el- to be cheerful, like a little chad its eyes at sit of a striped "Death hath ten thousand doors for men to make their exit." And they all lead to peace, rest, freedom from the world's worries, responsibilities and anxieties. It ia fortunate for the race that devine wisdom makes us iding to life. If we were all as :me as Bacon and as philosophical as the old Greeks, many would be missing. The Germagoerment wants o improve conditions, and goes at it with something of Mussolini's thor- oughnes Taking prices of August 1, 1930, as a "peak" basi the min- iste of economics orders price re- ductions on necessities of at lea 10 per cent. This applies to all goods produced by "cartels," which we should call "t--rusts." The list includes nearly half of all articles used daily in Germany. two yea-s, will be leaving lssaquah tomorrow, and will locate in Ever- son, Wash. Dr. Lightburne has form- eel some close attachments in Iesa- quah, through both friendships and in a profeional way, and will be deeply. So will the two Mrs. Lightburnes,himmother and his wife, who have made warm friends with all with whom they came in conta Issaquah regrets their leaving and wishes them well wherever their fu- ture may be east. GUY C. BATY Guy C. Baty, prominnet business man of Monohon, passed away at his home January 7. Mr. Baty sustained a stroke about a year ago and did not fully regain his former health. Guy C. Baty was horn in Wiscon- sin March 1, 1872. He came west in 1900 and has been in Monohon eigh- teen years, more or leas prominent- ly connected with the lumbering in- terests there the entire time, own- ins an interest in the new property built inee the fre. Surviving relatives are his wife, Mrs. Myrtle M. Bury, his mother and a brother in McKenna, WaslL, nd a sister in Long Beach, Cal. Funeral services were held in Renton Sunday, followed by crema- tion. THE 0 E. M. Redfern, all of Seattle. [ " " ' I After the services and a number Kiwanians ] [ear oft of short tal00 ,ro00 ,he ,00i.rs, a mock marriage staged by the Rebe- kahs, was immensely enjoyed. While the play was in preparation Ethel Trees an( S rub: 1Johnson entertained with a couple of The agricultural committee wasi in charge of the program at Kiwanis I club meeting yesterday noon. The 1 speaker was Harry Leckenby and his t subject was on the care of fruit trees, shrubs, etc., including proper spraying. Several farmers f the val- ley were visitors and enjoyed the talk. An interesting variation was an all-Issaquah menus for the luncheon, stressing fried chicken, mashed po- tatoes, green peas, cottage cheese, corn bread, milk to drink, and ice i cream. The vocal experts of the club spent I a little time rehearsing some new songs, under the leadership of the new song leader, R. J. Schneider. recitations. There were fifteen or eighteen visitors attending, includ- ing a past president and home trus- tee of the Rebekah order, Mrs. Maude Davies of Earlington. Officers installed in Gilman Lodge were: C. A. Lewis noble grand, C.L. Olson vice-grand, Thomas Francis rbcording secretary, J. W. Finney treasurer, Gust Johnson past grand, Carl Soderstrom warden, C. A. John- son conductor, J. W. Francis and Win. Wood supporters noble grand, Fred Cussac and H. W. Eastlick sup- porters" vice-grand, W. E. Gibson guardian and E. J. Lindman chap- walks within the Town limits and al- so liable for any accident that is caused by poor walks. In the past year, several people have had severe falls from loose and broken boards. 5th. The Town Council has two methods of replacing silewalgs. Ist, ask the property owners to replace their own walks which they have done. 2nd, to replace the walks themselves and assess the wal:- to the property owner. Knowing there h.s deal of misundersta.. to the procedure taken ir ,:. ,:, the construction of con:.  ode- walks in the Town of Issaqttah, the Town Council takes this way to in- form you as to what is really being done. In the first place, a resolution was passed expressing the intention of building walks and calling for pro- tests in writing and a meeting adver- lain, tised and held to consider the sam, The Rebekah officers are: I At this meeting only sixteen and two thirds per cent of the total frontage Orpha McDonald noble grand, protested. Being satisfied that the Hannah Trigs vice-grand, Mary Kin- majority of the property owners fay- nune secretary, Mable Miles financi- i ored the improvement, an engineer II___x SCHOOL al secretary, Neome Cussac trea-lwas hired, the pretimir-:: .... urer, Velma Garner conductor, Lu-] made and estimates mai:ed By cille Mattiia warden, Emily Clark erty owners---based on the MAURICE J. THOMAS and Anna Brooks supporters noble neer's estimate at $1,12 per linea Superintendent of Schools grand, Eunice n and Emily foot on a five-foot walk. Bids were Cedarholm supporters of vice-grand, called for and a low bid of $16,- THE SCHOOL PLANT Anna Johnson sentinel, Anna .  897.44 was received, or 82 , c,,. The dimmasion of a uhool plant chaplain, Arrabella Willmn musictan,, per lineal foot for a five-foot walk. should be approached from the Minnie Schomber past grand. I That 82  cents would include the mdpoint of physimtl adaey in . Luncheon was served to all in the t total cost of the walk in front of your reintin to instructinal tdcieney" nquet rm after the meeting fic:Urwde; =eg:?: 0EWl2LO i :r'?; d ucational endeavor is centralized in one main building with three adja- 1 puty grand patriarch: cent annexes used for instructional "BONDS purposes and another for recreation-I A. Palmer chief patriarch, Cha This improvement was to be finan Ainer high priest, E. J. Anderson eed by ten-year bonds bearing inter- al activities. I senior warden, H. W. Eastlick jun- eat at the rate of six per cent. The It is admitted by all school admin- ior warden, E. J. Lindman recording contractor was to be paid w: , ' istrators to be bad educational prac- i scribe, M. A. Boyden financial scribe, at par thus earing the Town a, . rice to have the grade school and the  J. W. Francis treasurer, J. W. Finney high school housed under one roof. I Joe Lapine, R. G. McKee and C. A. ins costs or discounts. In other words, if the Town had to dispose This combination is harmful to both I Johnson watches, Fred Cnssac senti- the bonds on the market, they woud units, particularly in relation to lnel, Carl Soderstrom guide, l probably be discounted at approxim- taching and al in student associa- i _ lately ten per cent. Those dmdring tion. The ideal arrangement is to MRS MARY JARABEK i to pay cash for their walks would have a separate elementary school[  -- " t not pay any interest on bonds. Such consisting of the first six grades; at Funeral services were held Men-  payment would be due thirty days junior high School housing the sev-] day, January 12, at St .Joseph's enth, eighth and ninth grades; and i Catholic church, Iseaquah, at 9:30 a senior high school for the scpho-]a.m, for Mrs. Mary Jarabek, wife of more, junior and senior years. This I Joseph Jarabek, surviving. Services division is a recent development. It lwer e read by Reverend Father Mead Ims taken such a foothold in our e d- of Renton. ucationat structure that, no doubt, Mary Jarabek was born in AustrLa in a few years practically every school system in the state and na- tion will be operating under similar divisions. The most practical division for a community of this size is to have a separate elementary school and a separate full, four-year high school course, The purpose of next week's arti- cle will be to show the crowded con- ditions in our grade school and also in the high school with particuIar (Continued on page 4, column 3) J tV m4 At 5 1V$ Hungary in 1847. She was married there in 1803, came to America in 1879 and to Issaquah abtut twenty- eight years ago. Eleven children were born to the couple three of whom survive: Ma. Mary Neupauer, Seattle; Joseph Jar- abek, British Columbia; Mrs. Ag- nes Fischer, Issaquah. Also sixteen grandchildren and five greatgrand- children. The couple enjoyed sixty- eight years of married life together. Interment was made in Evergreen cemetery, Renton, F.A.Fisher funer- al director. after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the Town. The first payment on bonds would be- come due one year after the date of acceptance of the eompleted work. FIXED ESTIMATE The fixed estimate included, e- neering, legal services, inspectflon of work, and interest on warrants drawn for preliminary expenses. SPECIFICATIONS The specifications being used are standard, they are virtually the same as those used in any other city on a job of this kind and were not drawn up to give anyone the advant- age. They contain a clause which specifically states that where poi- hie, local labor and material shall be treed, and another says that the wa, (Continued on page 4, column 1- Playing Nicely in Attic . , ii hisWeek THE ISSAQ!_AH PRESS Some Small Straws Hope Deferred We Rebuke Liberia As Hitler Sees Us ARTHUR BRISBANE straws blowing in an un- direction are not important themselves but call for attention. a group of farmers in Ar- entered stores, demanding VOLUME 15 Sidewalk Program Is Side-tracked Council decided at last l "night's meeting to start for their children, all over again. came a not very serious on the Newark City Hall by At the special meeting of the Clt: .'ho call themselves! Council last evening announcement was made that sufficient signatures the' accompanied the paving protest to in New York, acro River, crowds stormed Sal- prevent the work continuing. This left two courses to be pur- sued: either drop the matter entire- ly and assess the expense thus far incurred, about $2,000, against the district sought to be paved, for which the tax payer would receive nothing in return, or start all over again. i After due deliberation it was de- cided to take the latter course. Army food sores shoutin stan-e ! Fight." Fifty injured. this doesn't mean much among people, but it does mean any distribution of food or or arrangements for free should be looked after by efficiently . It isn't ..... ID ISSAQUAH, KING CO., WASH, THURSDAY, JAN. 15, 1931 i ii A/ong Concrete NUMBER 19 The 6da Falow00IS00dew.lk Stua,00o. 00ders_!ns_tal! ..................... I Facinglssaquah _ ' Rebekahs a n d subordi- nate lodge held joint ins- tallation Friday evening. An important event in local Odd- fellowship was the installation of of- ficer in the three lodges last week. The Rebekahs and Odd Fellows held a joint installation Friday eyeing and the Encampment installed Saturday evening. The work Friday evening was put 1 on by Mrs. Myra Fairbanks, past I president of he Rebekah Assembly, assisted by local officers, and the Council explains situation as they view it; asking the Voters to consider well. Why is it necessary to have side- walks put in at thls time? 1st. Only about one-half of the Town has sidewalks. 2nd. Of those, ordy about tenth are concrete; the others wood, and in only a few cases a. these safe to walk upon. The others are beyond repair and will have to be torn up and replaced. 3rd. Two years ago an ordinance following team for the subordinate t was passed to the effect that all walks work: M. L. Longfellow, deputy l in the future would have to be re- grand master, assisted by Thos. placed with concrete. Gillebo, E. I Smith, W. W. Levy and 4th. The Town is liable for all for a Red Cross, a Salvation: or any other organization out- of the government. deferred maketh the heart in the Bible, and i is also decision handed down by the States Circuit Court of Ap- telling Judge Clark of New that he was mistaken. The amendment was adopted It stands, and is the law land. To which you may add I the amendment won't be repeal- 1 for many a day. Stimson warns the Ne- republic of Liberia that slavery l be abandoned. Investigation I that high officials of the Ne- republic, including the vice pres- are engaged in the slave trade, i persist in it. seems surprising, Considering Liberia was planned as a haven slavery. s $ many of our best people and South, approved of slav- s little while ago, and we can blame the Liberians for lag- There were two strong points carrying weight for this come. First, j when protests were first called for in| .i r-o | a legal way but 16 2-3 percent off( .|1..  e.,00nteen the property owners made legal pro-| .... test. Since then over sixty pereent i tz 1 of those intrested have signed a pro-[ VL/|:gg: I -ran-,ers signed without understanding the t . v A,. case and asked to have their names taken off the petition. This could not be done. o the' administration feels a ma- jority of those interested would pre- fer going ahead to dropping the work and pay out $2,000.00 with no returns whatever. Consequently, at council meeting today noon,a new resolution, changed somewhat to carry the paving on the West highway to the Western town limit, was passed and appears in this issue. In another article in this issue the matter is being fully explained by the council, and it is to be hoped ev- eryone interested makes a thorough study of the project. BORN Jones--In Hobart, Saturday, Jan. 10, 1931, to Mr. and Mrs Marshall Local degree team active in subordinate and Pomo- na degree worL With about one hundred in atten- dance, Grangers enjoyed an interest- hag evening at the regular meeting Monday night. The big attraction was the confer- ring of the third and fourth degrees i on a class of eighteen members, four from May Creek Grange, one from Issaquah and thirteen from Midway Grange, located at Midlake, between Bellevue and Remond. Twenty-five visitors accompanied the candidates. The degree work was given by the local drill team. The team also put on work at  Midway Tuesday evening and at Happy Valley Wed- nesday evening. They have also been a little behind, especially as sla- Jones, a girL asked to put on the Pomona degree is about their only source of l at East Hill tonight, where Valley . stick of. candy. Prices are stronger, ! Central Grange i s entertaining slave owner gave his slave money m absolutly a drug m the[ King County Pomona. Y::dhdgl0wto?ao=tP  7i:tkind with which men speculate [ r:edm:cetingalmut nchen :7 sick. , call money, was lent recently at I[ s __   - lern industrialists gave the lper cent. And cheap money promis- joy.  er enough to keep  him going, | es to last a long time. On this o| _ _  . need not worry about him when[mon, proDavLg, ne l,'eaerm  ] LiAVINO LgSAUAM sick. In the eyes of Providence' will not try to force up intmt| .- "" ....... may not be a great differencel rat and that ought to help b| Dr Wm E Lihtburne who has bodily slavery and what  recovery " " " *"" ' Socialist friends call "wage s/a- " e * ] been practicing in Iasaquah the past I "Men fear death as children fear] to go in the dark, and as that natural] fear in children is increased with i tales, so is the other." t So Bacon said of our moat wide- I spread fear. Marshal Joffre, who has the grati- tude of his nation following him to the grave, quoted often the saying nul ne peut se dire heureux scant son dernier jour. "No man can call himself happy until his last day." see ourselves as others think see us, reveals surprising de- The Jewish Telegraph Agen- sends etening quotations the Volkiseher Beobachter, pub- ia Munich, to support Mr..Flit- imitation of Mussolini's Fuse- Under a heading "The true of America," you learn that build "'mausoleums for cats of! marble," and church build-i of "unheard of splendor," and have "'evangelists who flood the wallowing in disgraceful adventures that are reported in sensational press." you learn that a mother of children, "crazed with hun- shot seven of her babes and tried kill herself." paper, not saying what was matter with the other four, adds: is America*. Millions of cats, for hypocrisy, billions for luxury, but not a cent for mother and her hungry chil- all that is true, probobly we de- our "depresaiom" i making a brave el- to be cheerful, like a little chad its eyes at sit of a striped "Death hath ten thousand doors for men to make their exit." And they all lead to peace, rest, freedom from the world's worries, responsibilities and anxieties. It ia fortunate for the race that devine wisdom makes us iding to life. If we were all as :me as Bacon and as philosophical as the old Greeks, many would be missing. The Germagoerment wants o improve conditions, and goes at it with something of Mussolini's thor- oughnes Taking prices of August 1, 1930, as a "peak" basi the min- iste of economics orders price re- ductions on necessities of at lea 10 per cent. This applies to all goods produced by "cartels," which we should call "t--rusts." The list includes nearly half of all articles used daily in Germany. two yea-s, will be leaving lssaquah tomorrow, and will locate in Ever- son, Wash. Dr. Lightburne has form- eel some close attachments in Iesa- quah, through both friendships and in a profeional way, and will be deeply. So will the two Mrs. Lightburnes,himmother and his wife, who have made warm friends with all with whom they came in conta Issaquah regrets their leaving and wishes them well wherever their fu- ture may be east. GUY C. BATY Guy C. Baty, prominnet business man of Monohon, passed away at his home January 7. Mr. Baty sustained a stroke about a year ago and did not fully regain his former health. Guy C. Baty was horn in Wiscon- sin March 1, 1872. He came west in 1900 and has been in Monohon eigh- teen years, more or leas prominent- ly connected with the lumbering in- terests there the entire time, own- ins an interest in the new property built inee the fre. Surviving relatives are his wife, Mrs. Myrtle M. Bury, his mother and a brother in McKenna, WaslL, nd a sister in Long Beach, Cal. Funeral services were held in Renton Sunday, followed by crema- tion. THE 0 E. M. Redfern, all of Seattle. [ " " ' I After the services and a number Kiwanians ] [ear oft of short tal00 ,ro00 ,he ,00i.rs, a mock marriage staged by the Rebe- kahs, was immensely enjoyed. While the play was in preparation Ethel Trees an( S rub: 1Johnson entertained with a couple of The agricultural committee wasi in charge of the program at Kiwanis I club meeting yesterday noon. The 1 speaker was Harry Leckenby and his t subject was on the care of fruit trees, shrubs, etc., including proper spraying. Several farmers f the val- ley were visitors and enjoyed the talk. An interesting variation was an all-Issaquah menus for the luncheon, stressing fried chicken, mashed po- tatoes, green peas, cottage cheese, corn bread, milk to drink, and ice i cream. The vocal experts of the club spent I a little time rehearsing some new songs, under the leadership of the new song leader, R. J. Schneider. recitations. There were fifteen or eighteen visitors attending, includ- ing a past president and home trus- tee of the Rebekah order, Mrs. Maude Davies of Earlington. Officers installed in Gilman Lodge were: C. A. Lewis noble grand, C.L. Olson vice-grand, Thomas Francis rbcording secretary, J. W. Finney treasurer, Gust Johnson past grand, Carl Soderstrom warden, C. A. John- son conductor, J. W. Francis and Win. Wood supporters noble grand, Fred Cussac and H. W. Eastlick sup- porters" vice-grand, W. E. Gibson guardian and E. J. Lindman chap- walks within the Town limits and al- so liable for any accident that is caused by poor walks. In the past year, several people have had severe falls from loose and broken boards. 5th. The Town Council has two methods of replacing silewalgs. Ist, ask the property owners to replace their own walks which they have done. 2nd, to replace the walks themselves and assess the wal:- to the property owner. Knowing there h.s deal of misundersta.. to the procedure taken ir ,:. ,:, the construction of con:.  ode- walks in the Town of Issaqttah, the Town Council takes this way to in- form you as to what is really being done. In the first place, a resolution was passed expressing the intention of building walks and calling for pro- tests in writing and a meeting adver- lain, tised and held to consider the sam, The Rebekah officers are: I At this meeting only sixteen and two thirds per cent of the total frontage Orpha McDonald noble grand, protested. Being satisfied that the Hannah Trigs vice-grand, Mary Kin- majority of the property owners fay- nune secretary, Mable Miles financi- i ored the improvement, an engineer II___x SCHOOL al secretary, Neome Cussac trea-lwas hired, the pretimir-:: .... urer, Velma Garner conductor, Lu-] made and estimates mai:ed By cille Mattiia warden, Emily Clark erty owners---based on the MAURICE J. THOMAS and Anna Brooks supporters noble neer's estimate at $1,12 per linea Superintendent of Schools grand, Eunice n and Emily foot on a five-foot walk. Bids were Cedarholm supporters of vice-grand, called for and a low bid of $16,- THE SCHOOL PLANT Anna Johnson sentinel, Anna .  897.44 was received, or 82 , c,,. The dimmasion of a uhool plant chaplain, Arrabella Willmn musictan,, per lineal foot for a five-foot walk. should be approached from the Minnie Schomber past grand. I That 82  cents would include the mdpoint of physimtl adaey in . Luncheon was served to all in the t total cost of the walk in front of your reintin to instructinal tdcieney" nquet rm after the meeting fic:Urwde; =eg:?: 0EWl2LO i :r'?; d ucational endeavor is centralized in one main building with three adja- 1 puty grand patriarch: cent annexes used for instructional "BONDS purposes and another for recreation-I A. Palmer chief patriarch, Cha This improvement was to be finan Ainer high priest, E. J. Anderson eed by ten-year bonds bearing inter- al activities. I senior warden, H. W. Eastlick jun- eat at the rate of six per cent. The It is admitted by all school admin- ior warden, E. J. Lindman recording contractor was to be paid w: , ' istrators to be bad educational prac- i scribe, M. A. Boyden financial scribe, at par thus earing the Town a, . rice to have the grade school and the  J. W. Francis treasurer, J. W. Finney high school housed under one roof. I Joe Lapine, R. G. McKee and C. A. ins costs or discounts. In other words, if the Town had to dispose This combination is harmful to both I Johnson watches, Fred Cnssac senti- the bonds on the market, they woud units, particularly in relation to lnel, Carl Soderstrom guide, l probably be discounted at approxim- taching and al in student associa- i _ lately ten per cent. Those dmdring tion. The ideal arrangement is to MRS MARY JARABEK i to pay cash for their walks would have a separate elementary school[  -- " t not pay any interest on bonds. Such consisting of the first six grades; at Funeral services were held Men-  payment would be due thirty days junior high School housing the sev-] day, January 12, at St .Joseph's enth, eighth and ninth grades; and i Catholic church, Iseaquah, at 9:30 a senior high school for the scpho-]a.m, for Mrs. Mary Jarabek, wife of more, junior and senior years. This I Joseph Jarabek, surviving. Services division is a recent development. It lwer e read by Reverend Father Mead Ims taken such a foothold in our e d- of Renton. ucationat structure that, no doubt, Mary Jarabek was born in AustrLa in a few years practically every school system in the state and na- tion will be operating under similar divisions. The most practical division for a community of this size is to have a separate elementary school and a separate full, four-year high school course, The purpose of next week's arti- cle will be to show the crowded con- ditions in our grade school and also in the high school with particuIar (Continued on page 4, column 3) J tV m4 At 5 1V$ Hungary in 1847. She was married there in 1803, came to America in 1879 and to Issaquah abtut twenty- eight years ago. Eleven children were born to the couple three of whom survive: Ma. Mary Neupauer, Seattle; Joseph Jar- abek, British Columbia; Mrs. Ag- nes Fischer, Issaquah. Also sixteen grandchildren and five greatgrand- children. The couple enjoyed sixty- eight years of married life together. Interment was made in Evergreen cemetery, Renton, F.A.Fisher funer- al director. after the completion of the work and its acceptance by the Town. The first payment on bonds would be- come due one year after the date of acceptance of the eompleted work. FIXED ESTIMATE The fixed estimate included, e- neering, legal services, inspectflon of work, and interest on warrants drawn for preliminary expenses. SPECIFICATIONS The specifications being used are standard, they are virtually the same as those used in any other city on a job of this kind and were not drawn up to give anyone the advant- age. They contain a clause which specifically states that where poi- hie, local labor and material shall be treed, and another says that the wa, (Continued on page 4, column 1- Playing Nicely in Attic . , ii