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The Issaquah Press
Issaquah, Washington
March 11, 2009     The Issaquah Press
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March 11, 2009
 

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THE ISSAQUAH PRESS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009 A5 Contracts FROM PAGE A1 their unfair labor practice charges as a sign of good faith, he said. Until the mechanics ratification, both unions had been negotiating with district officials since June. Employees have continued to work, despite their contracts laps- ing Aug. 31. There are 115 custodial and maintenance workers and nine bus mechanics. Since the beginning, the negoti- ations have been extremely frus- trating, Powell said. Negotiations have broken down several times, leading both unions' representatives to file unfair labor practices charges against the dis- trict in October. Both unions' rep- resentatives also filed for media- tion with state officials. At issue in negotiations were language changes, such as the length of time disciplinary action stays on employee records, and wages. In a Feb. 27 e-mail to School Board President Brian Deagle, eowell wrote about his frustra- tions with Milton Ellis, the dis- trict's employee relations director. "The insanity with Milton and his mismanagement of these nego- tiations must stop and I'm asking on behalf of 115 ISD employees for the board to recommend the dis- trict follow through with the agree- ment," Powell wrote. That e-mail was copied to The Press. "These are our employees that are doing good work in our schools and our community," Niegowski said. "Our employees need to have a good contract and the district is looking at some pret- ty unfamiliar economic times ahead, so we also need to be responsible. It is not the ease of the process that is important, it is the result of the process that is important." Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392-6434, ext. 24I, or clusebrink@iss- press.com. Comment on this story at www. issaquahpress, com. PUBUC MEEllNGS March 12 Planning Policy Commission 6:30-9 p.m. Council Chambers, City Hall South 135 E! Sunset Way March 16 City Council regular meeting 7:30 p.m. Council Chambers, City Hall South 135 E. Sunset Way March 17 Council Sustalnablllty Committee 5-6 p.m. Pickering Room, City Hall Northwest 1775 12th Ave. N.W. River & Streams Board 7-9 p.m. Pickering Room, City Hall Northwest 1775 12th Ave. N.W. March 18 Development Commission 7-9 p.m. Council Chambers, City Hall South 135 E. Sunset Way EMERALD HEIGHTS ACAOEMY Pre-K - 8th Grade Eastgate, Bellevue Non Discmination Poficy EHA admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to the students at the school. It doesn't discriminate On the basis of race, color or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school administered programs. 425-643-1671 ESHB 1018 - Modifying when a special election may be held passed the House 67 to 29. This bill changes the dates on which a county may hold special elections. The new dates include the second Tuesday in February, the fourth Tuesday in April and the third Tuesday in May. The bill eliminates the date in March and limits the May special election to tax levies that had previously failed in the same calendar year or new bond issues. Now in the Senate Government Operations and Elections Committee. 5th District - Rep. Glenn Anderson - R-Fall City - N 5th District - Rep. Jay Rodne - R-North Bend - N 41st District - Rep. Judy Clibborn - D-Mercer Island - Y 41st District - Rep. Marci Maxwell - D-Renton - Y ESHB 1956 - Authorizes the hous- ing of homeless persons on prop- erty owned or controlled by a church. Also prohibits a county, city, or town from enacting an ordi- nance or regulation that unreason- ably interferes with the decisions or actions of a church regarding the location of housing or shelter for homeless persons on property the church owns or controls. In addition, housing of homeless per- sons on church property cannot be prohibited based upon the property's proximity to a school or day care center. Passed the House by a vote of 56 to 41 and is now before the Senate Human Services and Corrections Committee. 5th District - Rep. Glenn Anderson - R-Fall City- N 5th Distnct- Rep. Jay Rodne - R-  North Bend - N 41st District - Rep. Judy Clibborn - D-Mercer Island -Y 41st District - Rep. Marci Maxwell - D-Renton - Y ESHB 1978 - Economic Stimulus through transportation funding passed in the House 67 to 28 and in the Senate 45 to 4. Adjusts the 2007-2009 Transportation Budget by reduc- ing it from $7.4 billion down to $7.1 billion. Places $341.4 rail- lion in federal funding into the Transportation Budget. Delivered to the Governor and signed into law. 5th District - Rep. Glenn Anderson - R-Fall City- N 5th District - Rep. Jay Rodne - R-North Bend - Y 5th District - Sen. Cheryl Pflug, (R-Maple Valley) - N. 41st District - Rep. Judy Clibborn - D-Mercer Island - Y 41st District - Rep. Marci Maxwell - D-Renton - Y 41st District - Sen. Fred Jarrett, (D-Mercer Island) - Y SSB 5561 - Requiring carbon monoxide alarms in residential dwelling units. Requires all newly constructed buildings classified as residential occupancies be equipped with alarms by January 1, 2011, and all other buildings classified as residential occu- pancies be equipped with alarms by January 1, 2013. Passed 31 to 17 and is now before the House Local Government and Housing Committee. 5th District - Sen. Cheryl Ptlug - R-Maple Valley - N 41st District - Sen. Fred Jarrett - D- Mercer Island - Y ESSB 5768 - Funding and study for the replacement of the Alaskan Way Viaduct, passed by a vote of 43 to 6, requires the state to take the necessary steps to expedite the environmental review and design processes to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct with a deep bore tunnel under First Avenue from the vicinity of the sports stadiums in Seattle to Aurora Avenue north of the Battery Street tunnel. Sets fund- ing limits at $2.4 billion state funds with $400 million from tolling, and directs the WDOT to conduct a traffic and revenue study for a SR 99 deep bore tun- nel for the purpose of determining the facility's potential to generate toll revenue, due by January 2010. Now before the House Transportation Committee for fur- ther consideration. 5th District - Sen. Cheryl Pflug - R-Maple Valley - Y 41st District - Sen. Fred Jarrett - D- Mercer Island - Y Climb FROM PAGE A4 my fellow friends and fire fighters go through," said Julie Frantz, a volunteer firefighter with EFR who was a support volunteer at the event's halfway point. "All of the guys and women are inspiring and their endurance is amazing. It's definitely motivational and inspir- ing." At the event's halfway .point, fire- fighters can come out of the stair- well to exchange their oxygen tank, grab water or take a brief rest. Firefighters who are racing in the. event often complete the 69 floors without exchanging their tank or stop,ping. It s for a really good cause," said Matt Gardner, a firefighter with EFR who was helping Hooper with his gear at the finish line. I m very im- pressed." Upon reaching the last stair on the 73rd floor of the tower, firefighters have ascended 788 verticalfeet. The fastest time in this year's competition was 10 minutes, 55 seconds set by Missoula Rural Fire Department's Kory Burgess, 27. The fastest woman's time was 14 minutes and 36 seconds set by Georgia Sanz Daniels, 41, for Graham Fire and Rescue. While competition certainly drives the firefighters to raise more money, there is also a personal con- nection to the Leukemia & Lym- phoma Society for the men and women of EFR. In 2006, firefighters raised money in support of Julia Harig - the twin sister of volunteer firefighter Emily Harig - who was diagnosed with leukemia July 2006 and died in April 2007. "I think if we can make a differ- ence in one person's life, it's impor- tant to climb," Hooper said. "It's un- fortunate we couldn't make a differ- ence for her in time, but if we keep raising money it will make a differ- ence in someone else's. "It's like the money we raise for MDA," Hooper added, of the Muscu- ' lar Dystrophy Association. "There are 41 diseases and they found a cure for one, but that one made a huge difference to people living with it. This year, EFR firefighters have raised more than $4,000 for the cause, Hooper said. On March 22, thousands of people will participate in the 23rd annual Big Climb, which also benefits the so- ciety. That event is open to the pub- lic. To register go to www.BigClimb.org. Reach Reporter Chantelle Lusebrink at 392- 6434, ext. 24I, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment on this story at www.issaquah- press, com. Letters FROM PAGE A4 chance to improve her grade. Maybe, to make it clear how important com- pleting and turning in homework is, this person's daughter should bear a portion of the cost for night academy, paid for either directly with money or through chores. Remember, though, our children follow our lead as parents as to what is and isn't important. If this parent sends signals that homework isn't important, then her child/children will probably feel the same and this valuable life lesson will be lost. Robert Obedander