Newspaper Archive of
The Issaquah Press
Issaquah, Washington
Lyft
June 22, 1961     The Issaquah Press
PAGE 1     (1 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 22, 1961
 

Newspaper Archive of The Issaquah Press produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2018. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




DrucjGrand This Week grand opening of Hender- Drug in the Issaquah Shop- Center is set for Thursday, and Saturday of this according to an advertise- appearing on another page issue. This beautiful new store covers than 5,000 square feet, and livided into convenient de- for shopping conven- Among the cosmetics to be lea- are such well known names Dorothy Gray, Revlon, Max Coty, Channel, Lanvin Houbigant. The beauty bar incandescent lighting to out true color. Other departments will feature greeting cards, Veter- products, all known brands hair care, California-made new and exciting cos- jewelry, camera depart- with film processing, rec- watches, complete baby and the utility line of An- glassware. This is the third store for the Mr. Neal Woodhouse and Henderson. The oth- stores are: Holly Park Drug Henderson Drug at First and in Seattle. Between them, have more than forty- years of experience in the business. Mr. and Mrs. Woodhouse have children, Carol, a senior in school and Steve, who is ten old. They are planning to to Issaquah in the near fu- Mr. and Mrs. Henderson have Continued on page 5 F. W. AND AUXILIARY TO NEXT WEDNESDAY Albert Larson Post 3436, V. F. W. and its Auxiliary will hold a dinner at Alexander's on Wednesday, June 28, at 6:30 p.m. Ice cream, drinks and coffee will be There will be games the children. All members and their families urged to attend as a good for all is assured. Thanks for Help On Big Survey The Issaquah Press wishes to thank the men and women who took part in last week's reader- ship survey sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publish- ers' Association. At the same time, the Press wants to encourage those who did not return the forms, to do so as soon as it is convenient. Although no count has been made of forme returned from Issaquah the overall return from the 52 participating weekly news- papers was reported to be very high. RAMBLING AROUND with L.M.M. We girls now have it on the men . . . Guess what? The latest in men's shoes are,pointed toes... Can't wait to write Ann Flan- ders. . . You should take some time out to visit the new Hen- derson Drug which is opening this weekend . . . a real beauty. Issaquah is still a nice "little town", when you can see a small boy contentedly curled up on a stack of flour sacks reading a comic book at the Grange Serve- U... Don't have to worry about running out of gas these sum- mer nights with Chuck's Service staying open later than usual... Mays' Upholstery has a line of camel saddles . . . bells and all. Looks like the summer weather took all the gripes to heart and left for the other side of the mountains . . . I, for one, take it all back... NAME OMITTED FROM HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLL Scott Anderson, a sopohomore, should have been listed on the High School Honor Roll, pub- lished in last week's Press. ! The graduation party for high School seniors was another out- Standing success, with all who assisted deserving commenda- ti, according to the committee, Which especially praises the con- duct of the s4miorL Pictured above are some of the senior girls.. Top row (left): Laurel Davis, Donna Little, Char- itte Hyatt, Lane Hero. Second - t row: Kathi Larson, Barbara Baima, Marlys Dalbotton, Janica WolI. Bottom row: Kathy Died- rick, Michelle Ginger, Lliono Maggard. In the lower picture are a few of the boys. Top row: Jim Gep- ner, George Kresge, Phil Pearson. Bottom row: Gary Hoodio and David Lee. I i i THE ISSAQUAH PRESS Serving IssNIm Itigh Point, Preston, Upper Preston, Hrt, Coalfiold, Pine Lake, Beaver Lake, Lake Sammamish, Newcastle, Willowridge Volume 61 -- No. 25 THE ISSAQUAH PRESS, ISSAQUAH, WASHINGTON J Queen Laurel and her court are pictured just before leaving for the Derby Day parade at Fall City last Saturday morning. Al- ready these attractive and gra- cious young ladies have been Frick, Carolyn Hoialmen, Queen highly complimented on their Laurel Davis, Cheryl Donlan, participation in events in neigh- Kathleen O'Connor and Cheryl boring communities. Brown. Pictured (left) Rox - Anne Royalty Enioys 27 New Teachers for Par00 In Derby DayCelebrafion lssaquah Schools SUE, MURTHA will teach sec- tions of kindergarten at both Clark and May Valley. She has received her degree from the niversity of Washington. She has had previous teaching exper- ience in Wyoming. ELIZABETH PIERINI w i 11 teach English in the high school. She received her degree at Wash- ington State University. She taught in Palo Alto, California before joining the Issaquah staff. OPAL PRICE will teach the lower grades at Preston. She is a graduate of Central Washing- ton State College. She has taught in Snohomish for the past six years. MAZIE RECTOR will teach a fourth grade at May Valley. She is a June graduate of the Univer- sity of Puget Sound in Tacoma. MARJORIE SCHEDA will teach a third grade in May Val- ley. She taught in South Caro- lina last year after graduation Issaquah's Queen Laurel and her court, Cheryl Donlan, Rox- Anne Frick, Cheryl Brown, Kath- lean O'Connor and Carolyn Hoial- men, were received graciously and given generous applause at the Fall City Derby Day parade on June 17. The girls were beautiful in their new pink dresses and pink shoes trimmed with pompoms. They wore white gloves and car- tied white fans.e Queen Laurel carried a bouquet of white cama lilies, professionally arranged by Mrs. Harriet Fish, who, inciden- tally went "along for the ride" with the girls. Mr. Ed Fish and Russell helped decorate the new convertible car loaned by Jerry Malone Ford. After the parade, the girls and their chaperone were treated to a lovely lunch which was most appreciated after a very warm few hours. Twenty-seven new members of the Issaquah teaching staff will assume their duties when classes convene in the fall. Following are listed new members of the staff and their assignments. JUDITH BARNES "of Taft, California, will teach girls' phy- sical education in the high school. Miss Barnes is a 1961 graduate of San Jose State College with a major in physical education. MARTIN BUDZIUS will teach a fourth grade at May Valley Elementary. Mr. Budzius is a graduate of West Seattle High School and Central Washington State College at Ellensburg. DAVID BULLOCK of Kirkland, will teach mathematics in the Junior High School. Mr. Bul- lock completed his work for his degree from Central Washington State College at Ellensburg. DALE CHRISTOFFERSON joins the Issaquah staff after two years teaching experience in Ne- vada. He is a graduate of the lOc PER COPY Thursday, June 22, 1961 T o t a I of '2,326,937.67 In School00Buildincjs Approved for Issaquah Busy Day Set for Queen and Her Princesses On Saturday, June 24, Queen Laurel and her Court have been invited to participate in a full day of activities. They will start at the North Bend JamlSoree at an 11:00 o'clock parade. Mrs. Nancy Gildersleeve of the Snoqualmie Riding Club is in charge of the event and says thece will be drill teams, clowns, bands, and royal courts. The Queen is Shirley Noback, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Noback. In her court are Cathy Goelke, daughter of the Cliff Goelkes and Paula Hoss, daugh- ter of the Paul Hosses. Following the parade, there will be a gymkhana at the Rid- ing Club Field. Five Riding Clubs will be competing for trophies and ribbons. There is no charge for the horse show. There will be a food concession and there is plenty of parking: In the eve- ning there will be a Firemen's Dance at Si View Hall from 9:30 until 1:00. A quick, but safe drive, will take the girls to participate in the combined Kirkland Water and Strawberry Festival parade at 3:00. This parade is spon- sored by the Kirkland Eagles. The more parade and commun- ity festivities our girls attend, the more communities will help our Labor Day Celebration to be a great success. IN CASE OI  FIRE CALL EX 2-6666 Word was received by the Is- saquah Schools on June 15 of the approval by the State Board of Education of the four building projects in the district. A total of $2,326,937.67 was allotted for the total cost of the four pro- jects. The State of Washington will furnish $1,016,770.77 with the Issaquah School District pay- ing $310,157.90. The new high school plant was approved for a total of $1,632.- 086.45. Of th|$ amount, the State will contribute $1,419,915.21 and the local district $212,171.24. Sunny Hills Elementary will cost $486,628.43 with the State contributing $423,366.73 and the local district $63,261.70. The May Valley addition will cost $128,906.47 with the State paying $104,492.63 and the Is- quah district paying S24,413.84. Clark Elementary addition will cost $79,316.32 with the State paying $69,005.20 and the Issa- quah district paying $10,311.12. Final plans on both the May Valley addition and Clark addi- tion were sent to Olympia on June 15. It is hoped that con- struction on these two units will start in a month. Final plans for., Sunny Hills Elementary will be completed in mid July with contracts for con- struction being signed by mid August. Final plans for the high school plant should be completed by the end of August with actual con- struction starting in September. Board members and school ad- ministralors we r e extremely pleased Io receive State Board approval. Issaquah's projects were among the first approved at the recent session of the State Board. ParenfsThank City Council Holds .... University of Washingt)n. He from Central Washington State Busy Session Monday Seniors, All Who teach a 00venth College. Hlpd ,I. P tion at May Valley. . MARY LOU SEE will handle e e a a RICHARD CLARKE will teach girls' physical education in the The need for heavy oiling on give serious thought to the need a fourth grade in Clark Elemen- Junior High. She is a graduate several city streets was discussed of an additional fire truck for Due to an oversight, the fol- lowing names were omitted from the list of parents who so gra- ciously worked all night as hosts and hostesses at the Senior party: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Albright, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brockway, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Dicker- man, Mr. and Mrs. George Ol- son, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Quis- torff, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Wat kin, and Mrs. Louis Massucco. Also, a sincere thanks to all the officers, committee chair- men and their committees for an excellent job. IRV DALBOTTEN, Chairman. DEAR CLASS OF '61: Many, many thanks for mak- ing your parents and your eom munity proud of your conduct on your trip to Victoria and the all- night party after graduation. The reception for you was most noteworthy because of your poise and graciousness toward your guests who came to wish you well. Several schools have cancelled special senior activities because a few thought they were "big shots" and spoiled the fun for their class and the classes in the future. Many unsolicited compliments have been received by those planning your activities on your actions, attitudes and all-around good manners. VCe are proud that when in the public eye, you have always be- haved as "ladies and gontlemen" 'in the true and highest sense of these words. (Signed }, SENIOR PARENTS POLIO IMMUNIZATION CLINICS JUNE 26 - 27 - 29 The East District staff of the Seattle King County Public Health Department will hold a series of polio immunization clinics in the Eastside area as fol- lows: June 26  "North Bond Fire Hall. June 27  Carnation, Pilgrim House. N June 29  Fall City, New Fire Hall. The clinics will be held from 4:00 p. m. until 7:00 p. m. All residents of King County are eligible; there is no charge and no age limit. Children under 16, however, must be accompanied by an adult. First, second, third and fourth polio shots will be given. tary. Mr. Clarke is a graduate of Washington State University with additional education at Se- attle Pacific College. He has been teaching in the Highline district for the past two years. HELMA COOK will instruct in the first grade at May Valley. Mrs. Cook is a graduate of Min- nesota with additional work at the University of Washington. She has had ten years experience in the midwest. RUTH COYLE returns to teaching in a second grade at May Valley Elementary. She has had previous experience in Tacoma and the Issaquah sys- tem. She is a graduate of Wes- tern Washington State College at Belling, ham. LAWRENCE GAL].VAY will teach mathematics on the high school staff. He is a graduate of Forks High School and the Uni- versity of Washington. Previous to completion of his college prep- aration, Mr. Galloway served three years with the Marine Corps. CHARLES GILLIES will teach reading on the Junior High staff. He is a graduate of Seattle Pa- cific College with previous teach- ing experience in Elrrm and Fall City, Washington. ROD GRADIN will teach a fifth grade in Sunset Elemen- tar-/. He is a graduate of Seat- tle Pacific College with teaching experience in Canada. DAN KUHNLY will teach mathematics on the Junior High staff. He attended Eastern and Central State Colleges w i t h graduate work at the University of Washington where he received his Masters Degree. He has had teaching experience in Ephrata, Wenatchee and Seattle. MARY MACKIE will teach in the Primary grades at Clark Ele- mentary. She is a graduate of Central Washington State Col- lege with graduate work at U. S. C. and U. C. L. A. She has been teaching in North Hollywood, California prior to coming to Is- saquah. ANNA MAIrERS will teach a primary grade in May Valley Elementary. She is a graduate of Whitworth College in Spokane with graduate work at the Uni- versity of Washington. She has "taught in the Shoreline system for the past four years. HELEN MONROE wild teach a third grade at May Valley Ele- mentary. She is a 1961 graduate of the University of Washington. of Madras, Oregon High School and Whitworth College in Spo- kane. PATRICIA SHERMAN will teach a fourth grade in Sunset Elementary. She is a June grad- uate of Pacific Lutheran College in Tacoma. NORMA SHOWALTER joins the Issaquah system after teach- ing experience in C o n c r e t e, Washington. She is a graduate of Seattle Pacific College. EDWARD SIEMENS will teach English and coach Debate on the high school staff. He took col- lege work at Yale and completed his degree at San Francisco State College. JAMES SMITH will teach commercial subjects in the high school. He is a graduate of Wes- tern State College at Bellingham. SUE SMITH returns to the Is- saquah system to teach a first grade in Clark Elementary. She has been teaching in Mount Ver- non this year. She is a graduate of Western Washington State College. She previously taught on the local staff. PATRICIA PEA B O D Y will teach a second grade at May Valley. She is a graduate of the University of Washington with teaching experience in Seatthe. ROGER WILSON will teach a fifth grade in Clark Elementary and coach'wrestling in the sys- tem. He is a graduate of High- line High School and Central Washington State College. Fifteen teachers from this year's staff will not return next year. Zeta Rohm of Clark and Hazel Moore of May Valley are retiring from the profession. Walter Chenier of the Junior- High and Jack Stevens of the High School have each been granted a year's leave of ab- sence. e Abbie Hopkins will teach in Bellevue next year. Gall Johnson will teach in California. Irving Monteiro will join the King's Garden staff next year. Eleanor Culver and Maxine Hayhurst will teach in Ashland, Oregon in the fall. Janiee Smith will join the Yakima system next year. Eileen Hurtle will assume the duties of Dean of Women at Gon- zaga University. Ann O'Connell will teach in Utah where her husband has been transferred. Bob Runoyn will join a music firm in Seattle as a salesman. Gloria Mathers and June Beckwith will return to the duties of housewives. at last Monday's Council meet- in, and the Street Department was requested to take care of the most urgently needed oiling as soon as possible. Andrew Wold announced to the Council through the Mayor that he had available space for day time public parking area which cou/d be reached by the road past the Press office or by the road running between the P. O. and Fish Hatchery. The investigating committee for the Mountain Park water lines and roads announced to the Council that all water mains and roads to the end of the black topping irt the first division at Mountain Park had been accept- ed by them, but not the reser- voir; also an easement had been procured to enable the City Wa- ter department to connect the Mine Hill water line with the Mountain Park pump. Issuing of fire permits on Sun- day was diKussed. Decision of both Council and the Fir Chief, William Doherty, was that this should be eliminated and that those people desiring fire per- mits to burn over the weekends should apply for same between Monday and Saturday inclusive. The Council was requested to Gtorge Nowadnick (right) re- calves the gavel from John Fre born, o-going president, at the successful Issaquah Lions Char- tor Night and installation held at Lake Wilderness Saturday night. Orioy Sorroll, Zone Chairman, pictured in the center, had the City Fire Department in the near future as the City is grad- ually growing and expanding and these needs should be met before emergencies arise. A committee was appointed to look into the cost and type of fire truck re- quired. The School District presented a proposed roadway to the Coun- cil which would eliminate the old Gun Club road. Council consid- ered the presentation and then requested the map be passed on to the Planning Commission for further study. Dr. B. H. Simonson gave a brief talk on the advantages of fluori- dation of City water. Tho City Attorney reminded the Council that the next regular meeting would fall on the Mon- day before July 4th and that a majority of the council might be taking a four day holiday at that time. tCouncil agreed to set the date of the next regular meeting for July 10, and requested tho Clerk to Issue public notice of tha change bf the*regular meet- ing. Several group insurance plans for hospital - medical coverage were presented to the Council. However, no decision" was reach- ed at this time. charge of the installation core- many. Fifty-three Lions and their la- dies enjoyed the big event that marked the exact date of the first Charter Night, eleven years ago. DrucjGrand This Week grand opening of Hender- Drug in the Issaquah Shop- Center is set for Thursday, and Saturday of this according to an advertise- appearing on another page issue. This beautiful new store covers than 5,000 square feet, and livided into convenient de- for shopping conven- Among the cosmetics to be lea- are such well known names Dorothy Gray, Revlon, Max Coty, Channel, Lanvin Houbigant. The beauty bar incandescent lighting to out true color. Other departments will feature greeting cards, Veter- products, all known brands hair care, California-made new and exciting cos- jewelry, camera depart- with film processing, rec- watches, complete baby and the utility line of An- glassware. This is the third store for the Mr. Neal Woodhouse and Henderson. The oth- stores are: Holly Park Drug Henderson Drug at First and in Seattle. Between them, have more than forty- years of experience in the business. Mr. and Mrs. Woodhouse have children, Carol, a senior in school and Steve, who is ten old. They are planning to to Issaquah in the near fu- Mr. and Mrs. Henderson have Continued on page 5 F. W. AND AUXILIARY TO NEXT WEDNESDAY Albert Larson Post 3436, V. F. W. and its Auxiliary will hold a dinner at Alexander's on Wednesday, June 28, at 6:30 p.m. Ice cream, drinks and coffee will be There will be games the children. All members and their families urged to attend as a good for all is assured. Thanks for Help On Big Survey The Issaquah Press wishes to thank the men and women who took part in last week's reader- ship survey sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publish- ers' Association. At the same time, the Press wants to encourage those who did not return the forms, to do so as soon as it is convenient. Although no count has been made of forme returned from Issaquah the overall return from the 52 participating weekly news- papers was reported to be very high. RAMBLING AROUND with L.M.M. We girls now have it on the men . . . Guess what? The latest in men's shoes are,pointed toes... Can't wait to write Ann Flan- ders . . . You should take some time out to visit the new Hen- derson Drug which is opening this weekend . . . a real beauty. Issaquah is still a nice "little town", when you can see a small boy contentedly curled up on a stack of flour sacks reading a comic book at the Grange Serve- U... Don't have to worry about running out of gas these sum- mer nights with Chuck's Service staying open later than usual... Mays' Upholstery has a line of camel saddles . . . bells and all. Looks like the summer weather took all the gripes to heart and left for the other side of the mountains . . . I, for one, take it all back... NAME OMITTED FROM HIGH SCHOOL HONOR ROLL Scott Anderson, a sopohomore, should have been listed on the High School Honor Roll, pub- lished in last week's Press. ! The graduation party for high School seniors was another out- Standing success, with all who assisted deserving commenda- ti, according to the committee, Which especially praises the con- duct of the s4miorL Pictured above are some of the senior girls.. Top row (left): Laurel Davis, Donna Little, Char- itte Hyatt, Lane Hero. Second - t row: Kathi Larson, Barbara Baima, Marlys Dalbotton, Janica WolI. Bottom row: Kathy Died- rick, Michelle Ginger, Lliono Maggard. In the lower picture are a few of the boys. Top row: Jim Gep- ner, George Kresge, Phil Pearson. Bottom row: Gary Hoodio and David Lee. I i i THE ISSAQUAH PRESS Serving IssNIm Itigh Point, Preston, Upper Preston, Hrt, Coalfiold, Pine Lake, Beaver Lake, Lake Sammamish, Newcastle, Willowridge Volume 61 -- No. 25 THE ISSAQUAH PRESS, ISSAQUAH, WASHINGTON J Queen Laurel and her court are pictured just before leaving for the Derby Day parade at Fall City last Saturday morning. Al- ready these attractive and gra- cious young ladies have been Frick, Carolyn Hoialmen, Queen highly complimented on their Laurel Davis, Cheryl Donlan, participation in events in neigh- Kathleen O'Connor and Cheryl boring communities. Brown. Pictured (left) Rox - Anne Royalty Enioys 27 New Teachers for Par00 In Derby DayCelebrafion lssaquah Schools SUE, MURTHA will teach sec- tions of kindergarten at both Clark and May Valley. She has received her degree from the niversity of Washington. She has had previous teaching exper- ience in Wyoming. ELIZABETH PIERINI w i 11 teach English in the high school. She received her degree at Wash- ington State University. She taught in Palo Alto, California before joining the Issaquah staff. OPAL PRICE will teach the lower grades at Preston. She is a graduate of Central Washing- ton State College. She has taught in Snohomish for the past six years. MAZIE RECTOR will teach a fourth grade at May Valley. She is a June graduate of the Univer- sity of Puget Sound in Tacoma. MARJORIE SCHEDA will teach a third grade in May Val- ley. She taught in South Caro- lina last year after graduation Issaquah's Queen Laurel and her court, Cheryl Donlan, Rox- Anne Frick, Cheryl Brown, Kath- lean O'Connor and Carolyn Hoial- men, were received graciously and given generous applause at the Fall City Derby Day parade on June 17. The girls were beautiful in their new pink dresses and pink shoes trimmed with pompoms. They wore white gloves and car- tied white fans.e Queen Laurel carried a bouquet of white cama lilies, professionally arranged by Mrs. Harriet Fish, who, inciden- tally went "along for the ride" with the girls. Mr. Ed Fish and Russell helped decorate the new convertible car loaned by Jerry Malone Ford. After the parade, the girls and their chaperone were treated to a lovely lunch which was most appreciated after a very warm few hours. Twenty-seven new members of the Issaquah teaching staff will assume their duties when classes convene in the fall. Following are listed new members of the staff and their assignments. JUDITH BARNES "of Taft, California, will teach girls' phy- sical education in the high school. Miss Barnes is a 1961 graduate of San Jose State College with a major in physical education. MARTIN BUDZIUS will teach a fourth grade at May Valley Elementary. Mr. Budzius is a graduate of West Seattle High School and Central Washington State College at Ellensburg. DAVID BULLOCK of Kirkland, will teach mathematics in the Junior High School. Mr. Bul- lock completed his work for his degree from Central Washington State College at Ellensburg. DALE CHRISTOFFERSON joins the Issaquah staff after two years teaching experience in Ne- vada. He is a graduate of the lOc PER COPY Thursday, June 22, 1961 T o t a I of '2,326,937.67 In School00Buildincjs Approved for Issaquah Busy Day Set for Queen and Her Princesses On Saturday, June 24, Queen Laurel and her Court have been invited to participate in a full day of activities. They will start at the North Bend JamlSoree at an 11:00 o'clock parade. Mrs. Nancy Gildersleeve of the Snoqualmie Riding Club is in charge of the event and says thece will be drill teams, clowns, bands, and royal courts. The Queen is Shirley Noback, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Noback. In her court are Cathy Goelke, daughter of the Cliff Goelkes and Paula Hoss, daugh- ter of the Paul Hosses. Following the parade, there will be a gymkhana at the Rid- ing Club Field. Five Riding Clubs will be competing for trophies and ribbons. There is no charge for the horse show. There will be a food concession and there is plenty of parking: In the eve- ning there will be a Firemen's Dance at Si View Hall from 9:30 until 1:00. A quick, but safe drive, will take the girls to participate in the combined Kirkland Water and Strawberry Festival parade at 3:00. This parade is spon- sored by the Kirkland Eagles. The more parade and commun- ity festivities our girls attend, the more communities will help our Labor Day Celebration to be a great success. IN CASE OI  FIRE CALL EX 2-6666 Word was received by the Is- saquah Schools on June 15 of the approval by the State Board of Education of the four building projects in the district. A total of $2,326,937.67 was allotted for the total cost of the four pro- jects. The State of Washington will furnish $1,016,770.77 with the Issaquah School District pay- ing $310,157.90. The new high school plant was approved for a total of $1,632.- 086.45. Of th|$ amount, the State will contribute $1,419,915.21 and the local district $212,171.24. Sunny Hills Elementary will cost $486,628.43 with the State contributing $423,366.73 and the local district $63,261.70. The May Valley addition will cost $128,906.47 with the State paying $104,492.63 and the Is- quah district paying S24,413.84. Clark Elementary addition will cost $79,316.32 with the State paying $69,005.20 and the Issa- quah district paying $10,311.12. Final plans on both the May Valley addition and Clark addi- tion were sent to Olympia on June 15. It is hoped that con- struction on these two units will start in a month. Final plans for., Sunny Hills Elementary will be completed in mid July with contracts for con- struction being signed by mid August. Final plans for the high school plant should be completed by the end of August with actual con- struction starting in September. Board members and school ad- ministralors we r e extremely pleased Io receive State Board approval. Issaquah's projects were among the first approved at the recent session of the State Board. ParenfsThank City Council Holds .... University of Washingt)n. He from Central Washington State Busy Session Monday Seniors, All Who teach a 00venth College. Hlpd ,I. P tion at May Valley. . MARY LOU SEE will handle e e a a RICHARD CLARKE will teach girls' physical education in the The need for heavy oiling on give serious thought to the need a fourth grade in Clark Elemen- Junior High. She is a graduate several city streets was discussed of an additional fire truck for Due to an oversight, the fol- lowing names were omitted from the list of parents who so gra- ciously worked all night as hosts and hostesses at the Senior party: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Albright, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brockway, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Dicker- man, Mr. and Mrs. George Ol- son, Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Quis- torff, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Wat kin, and Mrs. Louis Massucco. Also, a sincere thanks to all the officers, committee chair- men and their committees for an excellent job. IRV DALBOTTEN, Chairman. DEAR CLASS OF '61: Many, many thanks for mak- ing your parents and your eom munity proud of your conduct on your trip to Victoria and the all- night party after graduation. The reception for you was most noteworthy because of your poise and graciousness toward your guests who came to wish you well. Several schools have cancelled special senior activities because a few thought they were "big shots" and spoiled the fun for their class and the classes in the future. Many unsolicited compliments have been received by those planning your activities on your actions, attitudes and all-around good manners. VCe are proud that when in the public eye, you have always be- haved as "ladies and gontlemen" 'in the true and highest sense of these words. (Signed }, SENIOR PARENTS POLIO IMMUNIZATION CLINICS JUNE 26 - 27 - 29 The East District staff of the Seattle King County Public Health Department will hold a series of polio immunization clinics in the Eastside area as fol- lows: June 26  "North Bond Fire Hall. June 27  Carnation, Pilgrim House. N June 29  Fall City, New Fire Hall. The clinics will be held from 4:00 p. m. until 7:00 p. m. All residents of King County are eligible; there is no charge and no age limit. Children under 16, however, must be accompanied by an adult. First, second, third and fourth polio shots will be given. tary. Mr. Clarke is a graduate of Washington State University with additional education at Se- attle Pacific College. He has been teaching in the Highline district for the past two years. HELMA COOK will instruct in the first grade at May Valley. Mrs. Cook is a graduate of Min- nesota with additional work at the University of Washington. She has had ten years experience in the midwest. RUTH COYLE returns to teaching in a second grade at May Valley Elementary. She has had previous experience in Tacoma and the Issaquah sys- tem. She is a graduate of Wes- tern Washington State College at Belling, ham. LAWRENCE GAL].VAY will teach mathematics on the high school staff. He is a graduate of Forks High School and the Uni- versity of Washington. Previous to completion of his college prep- aration, Mr. Galloway served three years with the Marine Corps. CHARLES GILLIES will teach reading on the Junior High staff. He is a graduate of Seattle Pa- cific College with previous teach- ing experience in Elrrm and Fall City, Washington. ROD GRADIN will teach a fifth grade in Sunset Elemen- tar-/. He is a graduate of Seat- tle Pacific College with teaching experience in Canada. DAN KUHNLY will teach mathematics on the Junior High staff. He attended Eastern and Central State Colleges w i t h graduate work at the University of Washington where he received his Masters Degree. He has had teaching experience in Ephrata, Wenatchee and Seattle. MARY MACKIE will teach in the Primary grades at Clark Ele- mentary. She is a graduate of Central Washington State Col- lege with graduate work at U. S. C. and U. C. L. A. She has been teaching in North Hollywood, California prior to coming to Is- saquah. ANNA MAIrERS will teach a primary grade in May Valley Elementary. She is a graduate of Whitworth College in Spokane with graduate work at the Uni- versity of Washington. She has "taught in the Shoreline system for the past four years. HELEN MONROE wild teach a third grade at May Valley Ele- mentary. She is a 1961 graduate of the University of Washington. of Madras, Oregon High School and Whitworth College in Spo- kane. PATRICIA SHERMAN will teach a fourth grade in Sunset Elementary. She is a June grad- uate of Pacific Lutheran College in Tacoma. NORMA SHOWALTER joins the Issaquah system after teach- ing experience in C o n c r e t e, Washington. She is a graduate of Seattle Pacific College. EDWARD SIEMENS will teach English and coach Debate on the high school staff. He took col- lege work at Yale and completed his degree at San Francisco State College. JAMES SMITH will teach commercial subjects in the high school. He is a graduate of Wes- tern State College at Bellingham. SUE SMITH returns to the Is- saquah system to teach a first grade in Clark Elementary. She has been teaching in Mount Ver- non this year. She is a graduate of Western Washington State College. She previously taught on the local staff. PATRICIA PEA B O D Y will teach a second grade at May Valley. She is a graduate of the University of Washington with teaching experience in Seatthe. ROGER WILSON will teach a fifth grade in Clark Elementary and coach'wrestling in the sys- tem. He is a graduate of High- line High School and Central Washington State College. Fifteen teachers from this year's staff will not return next year. Zeta Rohm of Clark and Hazel Moore of May Valley are retiring from the profession. Walter Chenier of the Junior- High and Jack Stevens of the High School have each been granted a year's leave of ab- sence. e Abbie Hopkins will teach in Bellevue next year. Gall Johnson will teach in California. Irving Monteiro will join the King's Garden staff next year. Eleanor Culver and Maxine Hayhurst will teach in Ashland, Oregon in the fall. Janiee Smith will join the Yakima system next year. Eileen Hurtle will assume the duties of Dean of Women at Gon- zaga University. Ann O'Connell will teach in Utah where her husband has been transferred. Bob Runoyn will join a music firm in Seattle as a salesman. Gloria Mathers and June Beckwith will return to the duties of housewives. at last Monday's Council meet- in, and the Street Department was requested to take care of the most urgently needed oiling as soon as possible. Andrew Wold announced to the Council through the Mayor that he had available space for day time public parking area which cou/d be reached by the road past the Press office or by the road running between the P. O. and Fish Hatchery. The investigating committee for the Mountain Park water lines and roads announced to the Council that all water mains and roads to the end of the black topping irt the first division at Mountain Park had been accept- ed by them, but not the reser- voir; also an easement had been procured to enable the City Wa- ter department to connect the Mine Hill water line with the Mountain Park pump. Issuing of fire permits on Sun- day was diKussed. Decision of both Council and the Fir Chief, William Doherty, was that this should be eliminated and that those people desiring fire per- mits to burn over the weekends should apply for same between Monday and Saturday inclusive. The Council was requested to Gtorge Nowadnick (right) re- calves the gavel from John Fre born, o-going president, at the successful Issaquah Lions Char- tor Night and installation held at Lake Wilderness Saturday night. Orioy Sorroll, Zone Chairman, pictured in the center, had the City Fire Department in the near future as the City is grad- ually growing and expanding and these needs should be met before emergencies arise. A committee was appointed to look into the cost and type of fire truck re- quired. The School District presented a proposed roadway to the Coun- cil which would eliminate the old Gun Club road. Council consid- ered the presentation and then requested the map be passed on to the Planning Commission for further study. Dr. B. H. Simonson gave a brief talk on the advantages of fluori- dation of City water. Tho City Attorney reminded the Council that the next regular meeting would fall on the Mon- day before July 4th and that a majority of the council might be taking a four day holiday at that time. tCouncil agreed to set the date of the next regular meeting for July 10, and requested tho Clerk to Issue public notice of tha change bf the*regular meet- ing. Several group insurance plans for hospital - medical coverage were presented to the Council. However, no decision" was reach- ed at this time. charge of the installation core- many. Fifty-three Lions and their la- dies enjoyed the big event that marked the exact date of the first Charter Night, eleven years ago.