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Newspaper Archive of
The Issaquah Press
Issaquah, Washington
September 7, 1933     The Issaquah Press
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September 7, 1933
 

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PAGE .~WO THE ISSAQUAH PRESS, ISSAQUAH, KING CO, WASHINGTON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 19~ b THE ISSAQUAH ---OFFICIAL PAPER FOR THE TOWN OF ISSAQUAH-- Published Eqery Thursday at ISSAQUAH, KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON Subscription Rates : One Year, in advance .................................................... $1.50 Six Months, " . ................................................... 1.00 Three Months, " . .................................................... 75 Entered as second-class matter on October 27, 1916, at the post- office at Issaquah, King County, Washington, under the Act of March 3, 1879. M. A. BOYDEN .................................................. Editor-Publisher PRESS NOW SEVENTEEN With this issue The Issaquah Press starts another, its eighteenth year, fourteen and one-half of which have been under the present management. We are, all of us, primarily in busi- ness for ourselves--in an effort to earn sufficient worldly goods to pro- vide us a comfortable journey through life Attempting this func- tion through the publication of a country newspaper, however, places one in a little different position from the ordinary vocation, in that the only opportunity for improvement in any country newspaper lies in the improvement of the town or country served by that paper. Dependent en- tirely upon the patronage of the res- idents of the district covered, a paper can hope for increased patronage on- ly through improvement in the condi- tion of its patrons. Hence its de- sire to serve them. Another prime incentive is the im- provement of the quality of your pa- per. The collection and intelligent presentation of all the news possible is of utmost importance In doing this one learns of, and is more or less affected by the joys and good for- tunes, tht sorrows and misfortunes of all in the neighborhood. Comes to know them and regard them as one big newspaper family. It is all very aptly described in the following lines by William Allen White, which we clipped from Harper's Magazine over twenty years ago: "But know this, and know it well: If you could take the clay from your eyes and read the country paper as it is written, you would find all of God's beautiful, sorrowing, strup gling, aspiring world in it, and what you saw would make you touch the little paper with reverent hands." In The Press's newspaper family are people who have been subserib. ers throughout the entire period. We have one advertiser, John Fischer, who has never missed an issue. There are other local houses that have found the "services rendered by the paper to their advantage, some of them almost continuously. And there is hardly an enterprise of any kind that comes into the community but finds use for some part of the of $288,000,000 at last report. Its functions----what are left of them-- were transferred to the Department of Commerce. The other casualty x~:as the Pro- hibition Bureau which came into be- ing in 1920, spent $100,000,000 in thirteen years, and was involved in the toss of 250 lives Most of thai 1,800 dry agents were dismissed. Doubt has been expressed by some l about Washington backing the Pres- ident further than 96.8%, so many objecting to his moral code. However Tuesday's election dispelled any doubt of the 3.2 indorsement, making it 100 %. ] i Just when our school districts aret I being forced to economize to the ex-[ i ....... treme limit, it is going to be neces-t' serv ce ~ne paper oilers, xo all ....... I ~ .... sary to auopt entn'ety new geograpny ~nese patronswe extena our sincere . . .. . . ,,.. .,,', " " "~ r " .... " " text seeks, tlenceIortn an lslanu I tnanKs. UU worlaly guess nave .... . . . . . .. . - - T" " . b Wlll De a oooy oi lano entllcly sur-, come tnrough t[aem, ney nave maue! ....... I . /rounaea Dy ~ecr.--racoma aournaL it posmble for us to render serwce~ to the community, to help to build a' ------ [ Most of us will go a little slow] better commumty In the future we 1 /about criticising the present gencra-. expect to continue to support those[tien when we stop to think for a min-I things that to us seem to hold some-lute about who I got us rote our pres-I thing better for the people, through!ent messy our individual efforts and the im- provement of our plant, that it may 1 LEARN-'''~ " - I be better equipped for a better ser- In a recent issue of his Window Seat, W. D. Jamieson runs the fol- vice to a better community. CONGRATULAT IONS This paper has always championed what we believed to be to the bes~ interests of the fire department and the community playfiehL The two are now very closely related and we hope, to the interest of both. lowing under the caption "Rather Than Complain, Let Us Profit": "I learn as the years roll onward And I leave the past behind, That much I counted sorrow But proves that God is kind" ORIGIN OF SCANDAL Through this present combinationI Said Mrs A they have accomplished wonders dur- To ~rs J " ing the past year. Monday night Iin quite a "confidential way, the big building made its first finan-I "It seems to me cial contribution to the cause. MayI That Mrs B its future be as successful as its he-}Takes too much something in her tea" glnmng. It would mean a success- ful department. Most of us take the fire depart- ment for granted. We know where it is--occasionally we stop to stare at the red engine flash by with siren screaming, knowing nothing of the quality of the engine or the metal of the department personnel, or the adequacy of water facilities. But on these points safety of property, perhaps life depends. A competent fire department is a benefit to all the people, and not And Mrs. J. To Mrs. K., That night was overheard to say--- She grieved to touch Upon it much, But "Mrs. B. took such and such!" Then Mrs. K. Went straight away And told a friend, the self-same day, " 'Tie sad to think--" Here came a wink-- "That Mrs. B. was fond of drink." The friend's disgust ........ Was such she must 9us~ a few. It means money In erie I " " - "''" - " ' ~' ' n/orm a laay, wnlcfl sne nusseu, pocket--through lower taxes, as tax- Th " "-- ~ , . &~ .~/lra. D. es mevttably rise when taxable prop- At ...... ....... l nalz-pas~ saree erw is aes~royea, and througlt say- ... ,, ....... ,_ ,, .............. Iwas ~na~ zar gone, she coulan ~ see lags In llZe an{l ouuuln~, ~0DS an(l ..... -' ...... I This laay, we ln~oHles, ............. I Have mentioned, she we are el;Ill ~rl:rong zor l~ne zlre a~-[ ..... tiave neealework to Mrs u, partment, and congratulate them on} .... ' " , Anu aE sucn news their season s accomplishments. ] Could scarcely choose TWO PASS OUT Two famous government bureaus officially died the other day. One is the Shipping Board which, with its subsidiaries, received the neat sum of $3,600,000,000 in appropriations during its life, and had a book value But further needlework refuse. Then Mrs. B. As you'll agree, Quite properly~she said, said she, That she would track The scandal back To those who made her look so black. PUGET SOUND POWER & LIGHT COMPANY WHEII~ DO WE DRAW THE LINE t To our ugomem : Some -,~' that a c~t),. ~e o the tederal I|ovarnmenl ~uJd otto .rod operate the Ugh! and i~wer hu~aess he~31~ ~ rivers are wind in the generation of elec~J'*clty, that *o doing & the c~sumptmn o[ a natural ruour~, a Gnd~ven suet whch should be preserved |or the behest of alJ the p~oplt and not expJo~m:l (or private gain. Ii this conclusion a right, u it nm as ~ to amume that any blu~ne*s which involve~ d~ u~ of a nmural mmuree dmuld be owned by a Sovarnmenud agency~ Wher~ are ~ou going to drsw the ~ne~' If ~ is round m ~e m~er of po~r. ~en ~hv ao~ m all Imsme~? The government ~m, on d~ same ~ of aq~.~m~m~, go into o~er ~c~iviuea and hive the tame advantage oI being tax free aa to ks bu,ine~, properw and ~eurit~s a~ ~ h~ m the cee~ ol p~wer. I do not believe sound or conclu~ve arsun~nt, for publk ownership are to be found in ths fscl tha| natural elmurcn Ire used tO Janerl~e ekartcity or that ~ ;, e publk" nets|dry. The oniy sound re~mn wh~ the jovernmon! should be ,n an~, business ~ to being sndw!ng bene6ta to the I~ople hoe ok~insble, in an? other we[. PIIIIDIgf IP, Ik--.You desw the line. 6 FIFTY MOMENTOUS YEARS 1883 - /qo Jn/ f/Ae ..... ig33 OnSeptember8,1883,atGoldCreek, ssecond half-century. Let us pause Montana, General U. S. Grant drove ~" a moment and see, not what we the golden spike which opened the' htve already done, but what wc can first of the northern transcontinental railways, the Northern Pacific. At last the narrow thread of steel stretched without a break from the Great Lakes and Mississippi Valley to the North Pacific area, through vast and fertile fields and moun- tains heavy with buried wealth. Following the rails came civiliza- tion, and the growth of this mighty Northwestern empire. Through fifty momentous years, through the strug- gles and joys of pioneering, through the greatest war and the greatest economic trial-by-fire in history, the Northwest and the Northern Pacific have pressed forward, side by side. Now we come to the beginning of ytt do. All around us lie possibili- ti.s which we have not had time to mlize, wealth which we have yet to utllzc. As the pressure of increas- irg population and the urge of new scentific discoveries come upon us wth increasing force, we shall enter ulon a new era of development which wll make even the developments of th~ past fifty years seem insignificant. Tkrough the years to come the N~rthern Pacific will continue as in tie past--to pioneer in the econom- ial, c~cient movement of freight, in t~e pleasant and luxurious transpor- tttion of passengers. It will work, always, to glee to the Northwest he best of transportation service. NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY Through Mrs. K. And Mrs. J., She got at last to Mrs. A., And asked why, With cruel lie, She painted her so deep a dye. Said Mrs. A., In sore dismay, "I no such thing could ever say: I said that you Had stouter grew On too much sugar--which you doT" --Catholic Times. BUDGET 1934 Treasurer's Office Salary .................................. $ 120.00 Expense ................................ 40.0~ Total ................................ $ /60.00 Clerk's Office Salary .................................. 120.00 Expense ................................ 25.00 Total ................................ $ 145.00 State Examination .............. 100.00 Attorney's Office ................ 105.00 Election Expense ................ 50.00 Police Court ........................ 25.00 Toeall ................................ $ 280.00 IF pou want what pou want when pou want it--in the printing line-- WE HAVE IT I , f Police Dep~tment DR. D. R. HILLERY Marshal's Salary ................... 1080.00PHYSICIAN and SURGEON Expense ........................... :.. 25.00 Jail "r .................................... 5.00 [ Office In Ban---k Building ---._=-____._ I 'Total .............................. $1115.00 ]Phones: Office 142 Residence Fire Deparment 't Equip't, Fire Truck my ...... 575.00 Expense ................................. 175.00 Total .............................. $ 75000 Street Depa'tment Supt. Salary ...................... 12000 Labor .................................. 255.00 State Road ........................ 175.00 Total .............................. $ 550.00 Street Lighting .................... 1340.00 Town Hall expense .............. 120.00 Park ...................................... 100.00 Miscellaneous Fund ............. 200.00i Grand Total .................. $4760.00] Anticipated ]evenuee [ 15 mills tax, val. $16,000....$2500.00 1 mill tax, val. $16,000 .... 165.00 Licenses, business .............. 1200.00 Licenses, beer .................... 500.00 Interest .............................. 40.00 Fines .................................. 25.00 State Road Fund .............. 330.00 Grand Total .................. $4760.00 The above prelimiary budget was regularly passed at meeting of the town council Tuesdy evening, Sep- tember 5. In Octber the council will adopt the final mdget and make tax levies. Any tgpayer may be heard at said meetig for or against any part of the budet. R. I. C~SE, Town Clerk. DR. WILLIAM HOLLAND DENTIST office Hours, 9 to 5, and Sundays and evenings by Appointment Phone 602 Issaquah, D. W. HUME BARBER SHOP I Cleanliness, Civility Good Workmanship SHOWE ATHS FRONT ST., ISSAQUAH "It Pays to Look Well" PAUL'S BARBER Special attention to Ladies' and Children's haircutting -----O--~ Shaving Material ---o--- Sunset Highway, Issaquah. F, h. :ISI~, FUNERAL DIRECTOR FULl LINE of UNDERTAKING SUPPLIES Our most co~derJ~to attention is at your disposal at all times Calls answered day or night Phone M212 AOUAH, WASH. ISSAQUAH 342 We Deliver RETAIL ICE STATION Entrance Issaquah Park Hours 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. Everett's ICE Delivery Othr Haulin at Right Price Phone &92 II