"
Newspaper Archive of
The Issaquah Press
Issaquah, Washington
October 21, 2009     The Issaquah Press
PAGE 11     (11 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 11     (11 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
October 21, 2009
 

Newspaper Archive of The Issaquah Press produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2021. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




THE ISSAQUAH PRESS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2009 * B3 OBITUARIES Wilmer Wilfred Lessard Wilmer Wil- fred Lessard died Oct. 11, 2009. He was 85. Committal services were Oct. 20 in Mount Crest Abbey at City View Ceme- tery in Salem, WiJmer Lessard Ore. Dad was born April 21, 1924, in Lebanon, Ore. Throughout the early years, Dad worked at Grandpa's butcher shop. After Pearl Harbor, our father enlisted in the U.S. Navy, which sent him to Oregon State University and Harvard. After that, he spent the remain- der of the war in the Pacific The- atre as the paymaster of the fleet and an officer in the Supply Corps. It was shortly after the war ended that he would meet the love of his life, a gal that we would soon be calling Mom -- Jean Katherine Sieber. After a very brief courtship, the two ran off to Reno, Nev., and were married for 42 loving years, during which tune the two were inseparable. Dad has now been reunited with the one true love of his life, our mother. Shortly aider the two were mar- fled, our father took a job with the Veteran's Administration for a time. After that gig ran its course, our parents moved up to Seattle and took an apartment on Queen Anne Hill. It was at this point in time Dad started his corporate career with Moore Bus'mess Forms, where he spent 30 years. Dad then took re- tirement to take care of Mom, as she was in declining health. Dad was preceded in passing by his parents, W.P. and Beulah Lessard, of Woodburn, Ore., our mother Jean Katherine Lessard, of Issaquah, and a grandson, Keith W. Lessard, of Bellevue. Dad is survived by his son William Alan Lessard and his wife Lisa, his daughter Suzanne Denise Barrett and her husband Greg -- who has beengreat sup- port throughout this difficult time. He is also survived by a grandson and a great-grandson. The family suggests remem- brances to the American Heart Association. Arrangements were by Flintoft's Issaquah Funeral Home. Friends are invited to share memories, view photos and sign the family's online guest book at www.flintofts, com. Tom Lee Moore Tom Lee Moore, of Walla Walla, died peacefully the morn- ing of Oct. 10, 2009, after a tena- cious battle with cancer. He was 76. A celebration of Tom's life will be at 4 p.m. Oct. 23 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, 220 Mountain Park Blvd., Issaquah. He was surrounded by his lov- ing family and close friends dur- ing his stay at Swedish Medical Center, where the care was un- surpassed. During his final days, he never lost his sense of humor or passion for building and remodeling homes. His home in Walla Walla, his final project, exemplified his talents. Born June 22, 1933, Tom grew up on Capitol Hill in Seat- tle and attended Seattle Prep, Seattle U and the University of Washington. As a young man, he worked in the grocery busi- ness and at The Boeing Co., be- fore founding Issaquah Real Es- tate Co. and Issaquah Construc- tion Co. It was there that he ful- filled his passion for building, remodeling and selling custom homes. He lived for many years on the shores of Beaver Lake, Hugh 'Mac' Thomas Macdonald Elsea. Hugh "Mac" Thomas Mac- ::: donald died Sept. 28, 2009. He was 88. Hugh was born Sept. 19, 1921, in Santa Cruz, Calif. He grew up in Santa Cruz. Hugh Macdonald He worked in the Sierra Mountains, in the gold mines, and then for Coast County Electric in Santa Cruz. On Aug. 2, 1942, he enlisted in Salinas, Calif., Basic Training Presidio, of Monterey, and spent three years in the Army Air Corps as an air- craft electrician. He was honor- ably discharged in December 1945. Mac went on to work for Santa Rosa Oil, Bell Phone Co. and then Mall Tool Co., which transferred him to Seattle in 1950. He then worked for Bow Lake Equipment and finally Deeny Construction, retiring af- ter 27 y, ears of service. Hugh s father, Duncan Gow Macdonald, of Sterling, Scotland, came to California in 1912. Hugh's mother, Susan Lillian Boyd, of Green Mount, England, came to California in 1903. Both preceded him in death, along with his brother Duncan Boyd Macdonald and daughter Linda where he constructed several homes. Tom was an avid and accom- plished golfer and charter mem- ber of Sahalee Country Club, where he met many lifelong friends. He was a huge Husky football fan and attended nearly every home game with his par- ents Jack and Alva Marie, who preceded him in death. Tom also loved cooking, writing poetry and animals. More than anything, he loved to tell stories, often more than once. Tom is survived by his chil- dren, Colleen Carroll (Gregg), of Renton, Teri Gordon, of Sam- Hugh married Marie Eugenia Steinbeck on March 17, 1951. Marie had two daughters, 4- year-old Linda and 2-year-old Di- ane. Then, son Thomas Duncan Macdonald was born Feb. 21, 1952. Marie passed away Jan. 18, 1987. Later that year, Hugh met Wetha Jane Thurlow and they were married June 11, 1987. Hugh enjoyed camping, fishing and riding motorcycles with fam- ily and friends in Eastern Wash- ington. Mac, as most friends called him, worked as a me- chanic, welder and jack of all trades. Heenjoyed working, re- pairing and making things for friends. Hugh is survived by Wetha "Jane;" daughter and son-in-law Diane and Mike Bumstead, of Enumclaw; son and daughter- in-law Thomas and Judi Mac- donald, of Hobart; nine grand- children; and 15 great-grand- children. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests remembrances to the Northwest Parkinson's Founda- tion, 400 Mercer St., Ste 401, Seattle, WA 98109-4641, or the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Re- search Center, M/S 35-200, P.O. Box 19024, Seattle, WA 98109- 1024. Friends are invited to view pho- tos and share memories in the family's online gnest book at www.flintofts, corn. mamish, and Thomas M. (Kathy}, of Richland, who were beside him during his stay at Swedish, along with his four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his sib- lings, Lynn Olson, of Chelan, Hugh (Jan), of Wenatchee, Bar- bara Petzold, of Sammamish, and Michael (Marnell), of River- side, Calif., all of whom were present during his stay at Swedish. He was preceded in death by his older brother Jack. Two of Tom's stepchildren, Carol and Kathie, were also at his side during his final days. ]PROM PAGE B1 walk past Brian's office. He'll see me. If I leave work, I have to go to the gym, because he'll see me get in my car if I don't." "It is never too late. It can be done if you don't quit on yourself," Wehner said. "You don't have to kill yourself out of the gate. You just need to make a commitment to get moving." Of course, running in a 5K race every month, or twice a month, has helped Herrmann. So far, she has participated in the Newcastle 5-K and the Alki Beach 5-K run benefit~g cancer research. Herrmann will run the Pumpkin Push Oct. 24 at Seward Park, and then the Jingle Bell Walk and Run, benefiting the Arthritis Foundation, on Dec. 13. At 266 pounds, Herrmann said, she still isn't sure what her ulti- mate goal weight is, but she's hop- ing to inspire others and has started a blog where she shares her trials, successes and a few skinny secrets. What she does know is that her ultimate goal is to walk the Susan G. Koman Breast Cancer 3-Day, which takes participants over 60 miles of local roads and trails. "I just want to be healthy," she said. "I think there are people out there that would say having extra weight isn't healthy" and that a person who is 5 foot, 7 inches and weighs 136 pounds is. "But what does that girl do be- hind closed doors?" she asked. "If she smokes, doesn't work out and doesn't eat, I think that is worse than having the extra weight, eat- ing healthy, not smoking and working out." "I like that she's not a quitter. She likes to be pushed," Wehner said about Herrmann. "That, ulti- mately, is what is making her suc- cessful." Chantelle Lusebrink: 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment at www. issaquahpr ess. com. PROM PAGE B1 but otherwise, it resembles every Sunday morning at St. Michael's: We sing together, read lessons from scripture, pray, seek God's forgive- ness and share communion." After the service, there is a cos- tume contest and an opportunity to be photographed with the church's "Great Pumpkin." Last year, congregation mem- bers came in everything from Darth Vader, as the church's or- ganist did, to Obi-Wan Kenobi, who Kody Lukens, 9, dressed up as. The two even had a sword fight. "It's a really neat experience. It keeps things fresh. The kids get really excited about coming to church," Andy Anderson, a con- gregation member and Kody's fa- ther, said in a press release. "The whole experience we put together is certainly fun. You see everyone at their creative best. But more important than that, this service brings families together around something deeply spiritual." Chantelle Lusebrink: 392-6434, ext. 241, or clusebrink@isspress.com. Comment at www. issaquahpr ess. com. Spread your good news! Births, weddings, golden anniversaries, achievements. Submit your news via www.issaquahpress.e0m CLUBS This week "A Deeper Well" Discussion Group: 8 p.m., Tuesday, Is- saquah Brew House, 35 W. Sun- set Way, 392-4169, ext. 105 Eastside Camera Club: 7 p.m. Thursday, St. Madeleine Catholic Church, 4400 130th Place S.E., Bellevue, www.east- sidecameraclub, corn Eastside Chapter of Par- ents, Families & Friends Of Lesbians & Gays (PFLAG): 7 p.m. Thursday, First United Methodist Church, 1934 108th Ave. N.E., Bellevue, 483-6642 Issaquah Business Builders: 7:30 a.m. Thursday, IHOP restaurant, 1433 N.W. Sam- mamish Road, 206-852-8240 lssaquah Guild of Chil- dren's Hospital: 11 a.m. Thursday, Elk's Lodge, 765 Rainier Blvd. N., 392-6625 Issaquah Ham Radio Sup- port Group: 7 p.m. Monday at the Police Station, talk in at 146.56 MHz at 7 p.m., meeting at 7:30 p.m. Issaquah Lions Club: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Coho Room at City Hall, 130 E. Sunset Way, 206-232-1700 Issaquah Valley Grange: 7:30 p.m. Monday, Issaquah Myrtle Mason Lodge Hall, 57 W. Sunset Way, 392-3013 La Leche League of the Sammamish Plateau: 10 a.m. Thursday, Issaquah Highlands Fire Station 73, 1280 N.E. Park Drive, 605-0837 or 827- 6843 Myrtle Mason Lodge No. 108:7:30 p.m. Thursday, Lodge Hall, 57 W. Sunset Way, 894-4410 U.S. House sets aside $500,000 for zHome The idled zHome project recently received a jolt of support from Con- gress, when the House of Representa- tives set aside $500,000 for the effort. U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert, the Auburn Republican who represents Issaquah, announced the appropria- tion after an Oct. I vote. Reichert voted for the bill, known as the En- ergy and Water Development and Re- lated Agencies Appropriations Act. A similar measure is also under consideration by the Senate. If the Senate approves a version of the bill, the legislation goes to President Obama for his signature. With 10 units, the zHome town- house development in the Issaquah Highlands is designed to produce as much electricity as it consumes. But the project has slowed as the eco- nomic downturn squeezed home construction. so much health information at your fingertips, figuring out what's best for you can be overwhelming. So why not learn from the experts? Come meet primary-care physicians from Swedish Physicians as they host a series of informative lectures to help you stay healthy. Classes are free and include time to ask the doctor questions. Be Heart Smart: Keeping your heart healthy Come learn from Jenny Chen, M.D., from the Swedish lssaquah Clinic, on how to lower your cholesterol and r~anage your blood pressure. She will also share heart-healthy lifestyle tips to keep your heart in g(xxi shape. Tuesday, Oct. 27, 6:30-8 p.m. Blakely Hall at lssaquah Highlands 2550 N.E. Park Drive To register, call 206-386-2502 or visit www.swedish.org/classes. Registration is required. PHYSICIANS | Sponsored By: |SS~QUA~ SENIOR CEN~E~